WINNERS NEVER QUIT:<br>  Marguerite Rogers Howie, African American Woman Sociologist

WINNERS NEVER QUIT:
Marguerite Rogers Howie, African American Woman Sociologist

Gordon D. Morgan

New Academia Publishing, 2006
172 Pages
ISBN 0-9777908-9-4 paperback

See inside for an excerpt from the book

Price:

$12.00 paperback

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About the author

Gordon D. Morgan is University Professor at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. His writings have spanned many aspects of the African American and Diasporian experience. His work and research have carried him to the Far East, Africa, the Caribbean, and Europe. He has received fellowships from Ford, Russell Sage American College Testing Program, and from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

About the book

The life of Marguerite Howie, a second generation sociologist, may provide insight into how society worked at the intersection of class, race, and gender.

Praise

“This book chronicles and captures the essence of the tribulations experi- enced by Black scholars and faculty in higher education from the 1900s to the present... Hundreds of Black scholars of Higher Education (in- cluding this reader) can relate to, and identify with, Professor Morgan’s comprehesive research and the history he has covered.”
-Talmadge Anderson, Professor Emeritus, Washington State University.

 

“Little has been written on the life of African-American scholars working  in traditionally black colleges and less has been written on the struggles  of African-American women scholars. This work provides a lens through  which we are able to get a glimpse of the struggles, divisions, conflicts, tensions, and solidarity that characterized African-American faculty at traditionally black colleges in the South. Just as macro-level history is most accessible through the close exami- nation of one person’s experiences in a particular social-historical context, so too the tensions at historically black colleges, the concerns of black in- tellectual elite, and the status of structure of the black academic commu- nity during the time of the desegragation of white colleges, all come alive  in Professor Morgan’s work.”
-Steven Worden, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Arkansas.