GOD, GREED, AND GENOCIDE:<br> The Holocaust Through the Centuries

GOD, GREED, AND GENOCIDE:
The Holocaust Through the Centuries

Arthur Grenke

New Academia Publishing, 2005
312 Pages
ISBN 0-9767042-0-X paperback

See inside for an excerpt from the book

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$24.00 paperback

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About the author

Arthur Grenke has a Ph.D. in History and Sociology, with a specialization in minority group studies, systems, and content analysis. He works as a historical researcher at the Archives of Canada and for many years has dedicated his research to genocide and expulsion. He has numerous publications on these topics.

About the book

What are the similarities between the mass extermination of idolaters in the Old Testament, the burning of witches in the Middle Ages, the extermination of native Americans, the mass killing of the Armenians at the hand of the Turks, the Holocaust of the European Jews, and the communist eradication of the enemies of the people both in the Soviet Union and Cambodia? Are these to be seen as unique cases, or as the result of a recognizable pattern? The author provided insight into these questions, basing his argument on the latest sources. He maintains that the study of the dynamic that lead to mass destruction may provide a better understanding of the holocaust as a recurrent phenomenon.

Praise

"This is a significant, thought-provoking work, encouraging us to reflect on dimensions of human behavior that are difficult to understand...Although to be reminded of this may be disquieting, it nevertheless forces us to consider the necessity of adopting meausres that will prevent the recurrence of the destructiveness described in this important, analytically rigorous study."
- Gilbert Gornig, Prof. Dr. h.s., Philipps-Universität Marburg. From "Foreword" to the German edition (Herbig Verlag, 2005).

"A reminder of the many genocides that befouled human history before, during, and after the Second World War, a plea that we hallow all victims of crimes against humanity irrespective of race, creed or nationality, and a clarion, alerting us to the oft-forgotten truth that each modern holocaust had ancient antecedents, horrors that enveloped civilizations and whose issue will do so again, perhaps evermore."
- Lubomyr Luciuk, Professor, Dept. of Politics and Economics, Royal Military College of Canada